RESEARCH PAPER
Perceived emotional intelligence and life satisfaction: the mediating role of the positivity ratio
 
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Submission date: 2017-10-11
Final revision date: 2018-02-16
Acceptance date: 2018-03-29
Online publication date: 2018-07-19
Publication date: 2018-09-01
 
Current Issues in Personality Psychology 2018;6(3):212–223
 
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Emotional intelligence is a positive predictor of well-being, and positive and negative affect were demonstrated to mediate this relationship. In two studies the balance between positive and negative affect (positivity ratio) is examined as a mediating factor between perceived emotional intelligence and satisfaction with life.

Participants and procedure:
Three-hundred and sixteen individuals (50% female) participated in the first study. Participants completed the Self-perceived emotional intelligence questionnaire, the Positive and negative affect scale, and the Satisfaction with life scale. One hundred individuals (79% women) participated in the second study. In the first measurement participants completed the Emotional intelligence questionnaire, the general Positive and negative affect scale, and the Satisfaction with life scale, while in the second measurement participants completed the Positive and negative affect in the past week scale and the Satisfaction with life scale.

Results:
In the first study perceived emotional intelligence was positively correlated with positivity ratio and satisfaction with life, while positive ratio mediated between perceived emotional intelligence and satisfaction with life. In the second study, perceived emotional intelligence was positively correlated with satisfaction with life and positivity ratios in both measurements. The relationships between perceived emotional intelligence and satisfaction with life (Time 2) were fully mediated by satisfaction with life (Time 1), and sequentially by positivity ratio (general) and satisfaction with life (Time 1), and positivity ratio (general) and positivity ratio (Time 2).

Conclusions:
Individuals with high emotional intelligence tend to be more satisfied with their lives, while higher positivity ratio mediated between perceived emotional intelligence and satisfaction with life.

 
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